Skip to main content

Search form

Click "Menu" to toggle open, click "Menu" again to close

Yann Klimentidis Ph.D., M.S.

Yann  Klimentidis Ph.D., M.S.

Assistant Professor

Epidemiology and Biostatistics Division

1656 E Mabel St
Campus PO Box: 245210
Medical Research Building 115
Tucson, AZ 85724
(520) 621-0147
yann@email.arizona.edu

Biography

Yann Klimentidis, PhD is an Assistant Professor in the Epidemiology & Biostatistics Division in the Mel and Enid Zuckerman College of Public Health, University of Arizona, Tucson, Arizona.

He received his PhD in Anthropology from the University of New Mexico in 2008, and has completed three years of postdoctoral fellowship in the Section on Statistical Genetics, Department of Biostatistics, at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Dr. Klimentidis’ research focuses on population genetics, health disparities, and the genetic basis of complex disease traits. He uses tools such as measurements of genetic admixture, genetic association, and evolutionary genetics to better understand population differences in disease risk. Currently, he is focusing on developing and testing prediction models that utilize high-dimensional genetic data for type-2 diabetes risk and related quantitative traits. He also has an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Center for Alaska Native Health Research, investigating dietary, behavioral, and genetic factors underlying metabolic and cardiovascular traits.

 

Selected Publications:

A.I. Vazquez, G. de los Campos,Yann C. Klimentidis, G.M.J. Rosa, D. Gianola, N Yi, D.B. Allison (2012). A Comprehensive Genetic Approach for Improving Prediction of Skin Cancer Risk in Humans.Genetics. In Press.

Yann C. Klimentidis, Akilah Dulin-Keita, Krista Casazza, Amanda Willig, David B. Allison, Jose R. Fernandez (2012) Genetic admixture, social-behavioral factors, and body composition are associated with blood pressure differently by racial-ethnic group among children.Journal of Human Hypertension. 26(2):98-107

Gustavo de los Campos, Yann C. Klimentidis, Ana I. Vazquez, David B. Allison (2012). Prediction of expected years of life using whole-genome markers.PLoS One. 7(7):e40964.

Paulina Gomez-Rubio,Yann C. Klimentidis, Ernesto Cantu-Soto, Maria M. Meza-Montenegro, Dean Billheimer, Zhenqiang Lu, Zhao Chen, Walter Klimecki (2012). Indigenous American ancestry is associated with arsenic methylation efficiency in an admixed population of northwest Mexico.Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health A. 75(1): 36-49.

Yann C. Klimentidis, Guo-Bo Chen, Mardya Lopez-Alarcon, Jacqueline Harris, Christine Duarte, Jose Fernandez (2011). Associations of Obesity Genes with Obesity-related Outcomes in Multiethnic Children.Archives of Medical Research. 42(6): 509-14.

Robert Makowsky, Nicholas Pajewski,Yann C. Klimentidis, Ana I. Vasquez, Christine Duarte, David B. Allison, Gustavo de los Campos (2011) Beyond missing heritability: Prediction of complex traits.PLoS Genetics 7(4): e1002051.

Yann C. Klimentidis, Marshall Abrams, Jelai Wang, Jose R. Fernandez, David B. Allison (2011) Natural selection at genomic regions associated with obesity and type-2 diabetes: East Asians and sub-Saharan Africans exhibit high levels of differentiation at type-2 diabetes regions.Human Genetics. 129: 407-418.

Yann C. Klimentidis, T. Mark Beasley, Hui-Yi Lin, Giulianna Murati, Gregory E. Glass, Marcus Guyton, Wendy Newton, Matthew Jorgensen, Steven B. Heymsfield, Joseph Kemnitz, Lynn Fairbanks, & David B. Allison (2011) Canaries in the Coal Mine: A Cross-Species Analysis of the Plurality of Obesity Epidemics.Proceedings of the Royal Society, B. 278(1712):1626-32

Yann C. Klimentidis, Miller G, Shriver MD (2009) Genetic admixture, self-reported ethnicity, self-estimated admixture, and skin pigmentation among Hispanics and Native Americans.American Journal of Physical Anthropology, 138(4): 375-83.

Dr. Klimentidis’ research focuses on population genetics, health disparities, and the genetic basis of complex disease traits. He uses tools such as measurements of genetic admixture, genetic association, and evolutionary genetics to better understand population differences in disease risk. Currently, he is focusing on developing and testing prediction models that utilize high-dimensional genetic data for type-2 diabetes risk and related quantitative traits. He also has an ongoing collaboration with researchers at the Center for Alaska Native Health Research, investigating dietary, behavioral, and genetic factors underlying metabolic and cardiovascular traits. Research interests include: Genetic epidemiology, Epidemiology of metabolic traits, Population genetics, and Health disparities.

Curriculum Vitae: 

The University of Arizona